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Connecticut State Golf Association
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Connecticut State Golf Association
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Handicapping

Handicapping FAQ’s

Select a question below for answers to the most frequently asked questions about handicapping.

 

What scores are acceptable for handicap posting purposes?

What is Equitable Stroke Control (ESC)?

What is a course handicap?

Can I post a 9-hole score to my "18-hole" Handicap Index?

Can I post scores on the Internet?

Can I post scores during the winter?

Can I post out of state rounds?

How do I correct a wrong score that is on my handicap record?

Can my Handicap Committee modify or change my USGA Handicap Index?

What does the "R" next to by handicap indicate?

What does the letter mean next to my Handicap Index?

What does the letter(s) mean next to my scores?

 

What scores are acceptable for handicap posting purposes?
Almost all scores are acceptable due to the basic premise of the USGA Handicap System™ which states that every player will try to make the best score at each hole in every round, regardless of where the round is played, and that the player will post every acceptable round for peer review. All of the following are acceptable scores:

  • When at least seven holes are played (7-12 holes are posted as a 9-hole score; 13 or more are posted as an 18-hole score)
  • Scores on all courses with a valid Course Rating™ and Slope Rating®
  • Scores in all forms of competition: match play, stroke play, and team competitions where each player play their own ball
  • Scores made under The Rules of Golf.
  • Scores played under the local rule of “preferred lies”
  • Scores made in an area observing an active season

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What is Equitable Stroke Control (ESC)?
Equitable stroke control (ESC) is a downward adjustment of an individual hole score based on handicap index to ensure that one bad hole does not have a disproportionate effect on a golfers handicap. This procedure is used for handicap score posting and is not to be used in any type of competition. Read More...

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What is a course handicap?
A Course Handicap represents the number of strokes needed to play to the level of a scratch golfer—or the Course Rating™ of a particular set of tees. A Course Handicap is expressed as a whole number (e.g. 15).

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Can I post a 9-hole score to my "18-hole" Handicap Index?
As long as the score was acceptable for handicap posting purposes you must post the 9-hole round. Each nine holes on a golf course has its own Course Rating™ and Slope Rating®. Make sure to post the nine-hole score with the appropriate nine-hole Course Rating and Slope Rating. Two nine-hole scores will eventually be combined to create an 18-hole score and be designated with the letter "C."

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Can I post scores on the Internet?
Yes, as long as your golf club has specified that they want to offer this feature to their members. Inquire with your handicap chairperson for more information. Scores posted on the Internet will be noted on your handicap card by an "I".

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Can I post scores during the winter?
Yes, but not in Connecticut.  No rounds played in Connecticut during the off season may be counted towards your handicap index. Rounds played in an area that is observing an active season must be posted.

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Can I post out of state rounds?
Yes. Many states use the Golf Handicap Information Network (GHIN) system so you can post a round score the same way you would at an away club in Connecticut. Even if the state does not use the GHIN system you can post your score manually by entering the Course Rating™ and Slope Rating®.

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How do I correct a wrong score that is on my handicap record?
The handicap chairperson at your club can correct or delete incorrect scores in your record.

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Can my Handicap Committee modify or change my USGA Handicap Index?
Yes, Rule 8-4/b of the USGA Handicap System states the following: The Handicap Committee has the responsibility of making certain that a player's USGA Handicap Index reflects his/her potential scoring ability. There are five areas in which a Handicap Committee may modify a player's USGA Handicap Index. (i) Improving faster than the system can react. (ii) Numerous away scores change Handicap Index (iii) Temporary Disability (iv) Failure to post scores (v) Player manipulates round.

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What does the "R" next to by handicap indicate?
The "R" indicated that your handicap index has been “reduced” due to exceptional tournament scores. The USGA Handicap System automatically reduces the handicap index of a player who consistently scores better in competitions than in informal play. The procedure requires a player have two or more eligible tournament scores and a minimum of two tournament score differentials which are at least three strokes better than the player's current handicap index.  An eligible tournament score is a tournament score made within the current year or a tournament score made within the players last twenty scores. All tournament scores posted will stay on a scoring record for a year from the date that they were made. A tournament score may stay on a record longer if in a year it is still a part of the most recent twenty scores.

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What does the letter mean next to my Handicap Index?
The following is a list of possible handicap index designations:
J = Local Nine-hole Handicap for player's home course.
L = Local Handicap for player's home course.
M = Modified Index (Index has been changed by the golfer's handicap committee)
N = Nine-hole USGA Handicap Index
R = Reduction (Reduced automatically by GHIN program for exceptional tournament play

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What does the letter(s) mean next to my scores?
The letter(s) after each score indicate(s) specific aspects of a score within a player’s record. The following is a list of possible score types:
A = Away
I = Internet
AI = Away Internet
P = Penalty
C = Combined Nines
T = Tournament
TI = Tournament Internet
CI = Combined Internet Scores

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About the CSGA

The CSGA functions as an extension of the USGA and provides stewardship for amateur golf in Connecticut. Founded in 1899, it is the country’s oldest state golf association and conducts over 50 Championships, Qualifiers and One-Day Tournaments throughout the year, in addition to administering handicaps for over 40,000 members and 181 member clubs. As a 501(c)(6) non-profit organization, the CSGA supports a variety of golf organizations within Connecticut, including the Connecticut Women’s Golf Association, Southern New England Women’s Golf Association, The First Tee, the Connecticut PGA, and the CSGA Scholarship Fund in honor of Widdy Neale.